Alcott, Louisa May (1832-1888)

29 November 1832 – 6 March 1888
alcott2

Image Information:

Photographer: Unknown
Date:
Occasion:
Source: NYPL Digital Gallery, The New York Public Library
Link: http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?495404
Permissions: permissions@nypl.org

Notice: Image is shown by permission of source. To use this image in your project, please contact the indicated source. Do not cite this page as the origin of this image.

Pertinent Archives:

Barnard College Library (correspondence and manuscripts) (http://www.barnard.columbia.edu/library/)

Boston Public Library (correspondence, receipts, autographs of Alcott, including letters to Maggie Lukens and Lukens sisters about their magazine, Little Things) (http://www.bpl.org/)

Chicago Public Library, Special Collections (autographed sentiment by and photo of Alcott to Edward H. Weiss) (http://www.chipublib.org/branch/details/library/harold-washington/p/Spc/)

Fruitlands Museums (personal and business letters) (http://www.fruitlands.org/)

The Huntington Library (letters to James Thomas Fields) (http://www.huntington.org/)

Ipswich Public Library, Ipswich Historical Society Manuscript Collections (copy of a “wail” that Alcott gave at a tea of the New England Women’s Club) (http://www.ipswichmuseum.net/collections.php)

New York Historical Society (letters to James Redpath) (http://www.nyhistory.org)

St. John’s Seminary Library (autograph letters to Estelle [Betzold] Doheny) (http://www.sjs.edu)

Schlesinger Library (correspondence) (http://www.radcliffe.edu/schles/)

Smith College, Neilson Library, Rare Book Room (letters and literary manuscripts) (http://www.smith.edu/libraries/libs/rarebook/)

Smith College, Sophia Smith Collection (articles on Alcott’s work, autograph letters, letters to Caroline Maria [Seymour] Severance) (http://www.smith.edu/libraries/ssc/)

Swarthmore College, Friends Historical Library (correspondence with Elizabeth Powell Bond) (http://www.swarthmore.edu/fhl.xml)

University of Virginia Library, Manuscripts Department (correspondence, manuscripts, photos, and other papers of major American authors with substantial holdings for Alcott) (http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/small/collections/overview.html)

Wellesley College Archives (correspondence with Anne Whitney) (http://www.wellesley.edu/Library/Archives)

Legacy References:

Bernardi, Debra. “‘A Bit Sensational’ or ‘Simple and True’: Domestic Horror and the Politics of Genre.” Legacy 16.2 (1999): 135-53.[GW] [LION]

Campbell, Donna M. “Sentimental Conventions and Self-Protection: Little Women and The Wide, Wide World.” Legacy 11.2 (1994): 118-29.

Carpenter, Lynette. “‘Did They Never See Anyone Angry Before?’: The Sexual Politics of Self-Control in Alcott’s ‘A Whisper in the Dark.'” Legacy 3.2 (1986): 31-42.

Carr, Felicia L. “Review of Anne E. Boyd’s Writing for Immortality: Women Writers and the Emergence of High Literary Culture in America.” Legacy 22.2 (2005): 199. [LION]

Chapman, Mary. “Gender and Influence in Louisa May Alcott’s A Modern Mephistopheles.” Legacy 13.1 (1996): 19-37.

Dyckfehderau, Ruth. “Moral Pap and Male Mothers: The Political Subtexts of Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins or, The Aunt Hill.”Legacy 16.2 (1999): 154-67. [GW] [LION]

Elbert, Monika. “Review of Naomi Z. Sofer’s Making the “America of Art”: Cultural Nationalism and NineteenthCentury Women Writers and Susan S. Williams’s Reclaiming Authorship: Literary Women in America, 1850-1900.” Legacy 24.1 (2007): 135-37.[LION]

Elliott, Mary. “When Girls Will Be Boys: ‘Bad’ Endings and Subversive Middles in Nineteenth-Century Tomboy Narratives and Twentieth-Century Lesbian Pulp Novels.” Legacy 15.1 (1998): 92-97. [GW] [LION]

Fetterley, Judith. “19th-Century American Women Writers in the 21st Century: Conference Notes.” Legacy 14.1 (1997): 59-63.[GW] [LION]

Harris, Sharon M. “Review of Elaine Showalter’s Sister’s Choice: Tradition and Change in American Women’s Writing.” Legacy 10.2 (1993): 142-43.

Hendler, Glenn. “Review of Amy Schrager Lang’s The Syntax of Class: Writing Inequality in Nineteenth-Century America.” Legacy21.1 (2004): 111. [LION]

Kent, Holly M. “Review of ed. Janet Badia and Jennifer Phegley’s Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present.” Legacy 25.1 (2008): 175-77. [LION]

Merish, Lori. “Review of Melanie Dawson’s Laboring to Play: Home Entertainment and the Spectacle of Middle-Class Cultural Life, 1850-1920.” Legacy 23.2 (2006): 210-12. [LION]

Meyers, Kate Beaird. “Review of Louisa May Alcott’s Alternative Alcott (Ed. Elaine Showalter) and Sarah Elbert’s A Hunger for Home: Louisa May Alcott’s Place in American Culture.” Legacy 5.2 (1988): 68-70.

Petrino, Elizabeth. “Review of Elizabeth Young’s Disarming the Nation: Women’s Writing and the American Civil War.” Legacy 18.1 (2001): 112-13. [GW] [LION]

Schultz, Jane E. “Embattled Care: Narrative Authority in Louisa May Alcott’s Hospital Sketches.” Legacy 9.2 (1992): 104-18.

Sofer, Naomi Z. “Review of Deborah Barker’s Aesthetics and Gender in American Literature: Portraits of the Woman Artist and Linda M. Grasso’s The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women’s Literature in America, 1820-1860.” Legacy 20.1 (2003): 211-12. [GW][LION]

Thrailkill, Jane F. “Review of Karen Sánchez-Eppler’s Dependent States: The Child’s Part in Nineteenth-Century American Culture.”Legacy 23.2 (2006): 201-03. [LION]

Trites, Roberta Seelinger. “Review of Elizabeth Lennox Keyser’s Whispers in the Dark: The Fiction of Louisa May Alcott.” Legacy 13.1 (1996): 77-78.

Vallone, Lynne. “Review of eds. Daniel Shealey, Madeline Stern, and Joel Meyerson’s Freaks of Genius: Unknown Thrillers of Louisa May Alcott and Daniel Shealey’s Louisa May Alcott’s Fairy Stories and Fantasy Stories.” Legacy 11.2 (1994): 179-80.

Warren, Joyce W. “Review of Ann R. Shapiro’s Unlikely Heroines: Nineteenth-Century American WomenLegacy 5.2 (1988): 66-68.

Williams, Susan S. “Forwarding Literary Interests: James Redpath and the Authorial Careers of Marion Harland, Louisa May Alcott, and Sherwood Bonner.” Legacy 25.2 (2008): 262-74. [LION]

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