Current Issue

Volume 34, No. 2 2017

Editor’s Note, Susan Tomlinson

Essays

Hidden in Plain Sight: Uncovering the Career of Lucretia Howe Newman Coleman

Jennifer Harris, University of Waterloo

Word Become Flesh: Literacy, Anti-literacy, and Illiteracy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Faye Halpern, University of Calgary

States of Innocence: Harriet Beecher Stowe, London Needlewomen, and the New England Novel

Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin

Creating a “Democratic Neighborhood” through Poetic Exchange: Lucy Larcom’s An Idyl of Work

Robin Rudy Smith, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


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Legacy Profile

The Girl Reporter in Fact and Fiction: Miriam Michelson’s New Woman and Periodical Culture in the Progressive Era

Lori Harrison-Kahan and Karen E. H. Skinazi

The Milpitas Maiden: A Story of Some Women’s Rights and Others’ Sufferance

Miriam Michelson

The Real New Woman. Miriam Michelson Likens Her to a Pleasant Dream, Not a Nightmare 

Miriam Michelson

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Legacy Reprint

The Building of a Reformer: Mary Livermore’s Poetic Involvement in the Anti-gallows Campaign of the 1840s

Birte Christ

Orrin de Wolf

Mary Livermore

The Conqueror and the Murderer

Mary Livermore

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Review Essay

Consuming Dickinson 

Alexandra Socarides

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Website Reviews

Memorable Days: The Emilie Davis Diaries, directed by Judith Giesberg

Desirée Henderson

Susan Warner’s The Wide, Wide Worlddirected by Jessica DeSpain, Jennifer Brady, Melissa White, and Jill Kristen Anderson

Brenda Glascott

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Book Reviews

Female Piety and the Invention of American Puritanism, by Bryce Traister

Ashley Reed

Civil War Nurse Narratives, 1863-1870, by Daneen Wardrop

Thomas Lawrence Long

Archives of Desire: The Queer Historical Work of New England Regionalism, by J. Samaine Lockwood

Travis M. Foster

Becoming Sui Sin Far: Early Fiction, Journalism, and Travel Writing by Edith Maude Eaton, edited by Mary Chapman

Hsuan L. Hsu

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